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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
write novels about the types of cases that lawyers like tony handle. in the daytime i work for a big law firm of the type that tony probably would not hold in the highest of esteem, but i'm delighted to be here. you know, i think if you talked to most authors, they will tell you that there is something hot-wired into our system that says we need to try to tell a story. there is nothing at all in my background. i am an absolutely accidental writer. there is nothing in my background which suggests i should be writing novels. i grew up in chicago. i write books about san francisco. i studied accounting at the university of illinois. i have been a corporate and securities attorney for 28 years. i've now written seven best-selling novels about murder trials, death penalty cases, and courtroom drama. i have never handled a criminal case in my life. [laughing] so all of you out there who are thinking of writing novels, there is hope. but i did have this feeling a long time ago, probably from the time i was in high school, that at some point i would like to try to write a novel. and i can't expl
became "special circumstances," story of a murder in a big law firm. it came out in 2000 and spent seven weeks on "the new york times"' bestsellers' list. so for those of you who have bought my books, i thank you, because now i don't have to practice law full-time anymore. >> but all kidding aside, you know, i think crime novelists and readers of crime novels whether it's lawyer books or whether it's private detectives or cops, you know, in my world i'm like -- unlike tony's, i can control the outcome. i can get justice in my books because i can fix the ending. and i start -- and most authors do i start with the ending. i know who did it, how and why. and by god, when i write that book, i'm going to make sure justice is served. i think that's why people keep coming back to lawyer books in particular because there's a lot of drama in the courtroom. there's always a murder. there's always big stakes. i've written books about death penalty cases. the stakes don't get any bigger than that. and i think it was important to me to have the center of my books a defense attorney who is the kind of
proposed also. i think those are all a big improvement. the other thing and this is certainly not discussion for today, but there are the parking lots which will remain as they are. this is not something for the future to look at. i think we could some day hopefully have some better usage. you'll have better parking but in an elevated structure that might make available those other areas for development. it is something to keep in mind as we move forward or expansion of target or other retailers of that type into those areas. there is a lot of opportunity there. it would look better from the street and from the air when you look at that. from the people who came from ewing court, most of you know it was long before at&t, at candlestick, or seale stadium. that was a cul-de-sac. it is an interesting history. thank you. i think this will be a great proposal and we will work with staff and i am in favor of it. >> i wanted to clarify what the commissioner said about design issues. to give some clear direction. you are supportive of changes at the street level, opening up more pedes
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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